Saturday, July 30, 2011

Re: Google Code Tutorials and Documentation - GWT OAuth

>>..... figuring it out on your own.....
 
Just an observation:

Google is a pathless land.  It is not a highway.

Most of the time, companies build highway and developers just follow the users guide and build applications to fit on that highway.
Development will be much easier and simpler; but creativity and innovations are limited by the width and breadth of the highway.
Moreover, all applications may look similar; may be on different flavors.
Many vehicles are on the highway;
Flavors may be different; sports vehicle; hybrid; bike, van, suv, limo, truck and bus.
But all are just vehicles.

In a pathless land, developers have total and complete freedom.
No boundary. It is a pathless land.
You build totally new and fresh applications.

Figuring it out on your own - gives you total and complete freedom.
Come up with creative and innovative idea.
Identify the API and try to use them;
If the current API doesn't meet your requirements, ask for new API;
Google may build it for you.

Again, Google is a pathless land.
Enjoy the total and complete freedom.

Regards,
Bala

 

On Sat, Jul 30, 2011 at 5:14 PM, Matthew Cote <mcjavalearner@gmail.com> wrote:
For Aidan O'Kelly -I just got back from that thing and I couldn't wait to go through this email slowly. I think the main points of this email should be posted on the getting started sites of  App Engine and GWT - its brilliant, I mean I can't explain to you how perfect this is for me, you have surely saved me time. Thanks - I am serious,

" Now, they DO make a good match, as they are both very
good at what they do (GWT on client-side, App-Engine on server-side)
but they are very different beasts, so you can't really 'apply
app-engine tutorials to GWT'.
 What you can do is, use them on App Engine, and then use the result
to power your GWT app. You might want to read up on the HTTP protocol,
Web Services / REST architecture, if you haven't already, as these are
the core protocols used to make your GWT app talk to your App Engine
back-end."

I needed that, I can't wait to get into it, it makes perfect sense too, my client-side code is done and what I want to do is use the app engine server-side. Now stop me if I am wrong, lets say I want to use only google technology, cause it rocks and its free, and I want to create a rich client-side UI that communicates with "the cloud" - and I mean "google's cloud" - then I want to use the GWT and the App Engine together like described above? If this is the case, then i feel there ought to be more on the joining of the two in the Tutorials - like a Advanced Tutorial. However, I rather like the idea of figuring it out on my own as you also described in your email, I am sure to learn more and for me that is what it is all about, but you definitely set me in the right direction. Peace.



On Sat, Jul 30, 2011 at 3:35 PM, Aidan O'Kelly <aidanok@gmail.com> wrote:
Well, if you've reached a point where you want to do stuff, that thereIf 

are no step-by-step tutorials for, you need to stop looking for
tutorials, and starting looking at reference material, ie, API
documentation, or documents/tutorials/papers on a specific technology.

You've touched upon it in your post, but GWT and App Engine are very
separate, and very different things. That the App Engine has a Java
runtime for you to run server-side code in, and that GWT compiles Java
to client-side code, is convenient, in that you stay in one language,
but that's all. Now, they DO make a good match, as they are both very
good at what they do (GWT on client-side, App-Engine on server-side)
but they are very different beasts, so you can't really 'apply
app-engine tutorials to GWT'.
 What you can do is, use them on App Engine, and then use the result
to power your GWT app. You might want to read up on the HTTP protocol,
Web Services / REST architecture, if you haven't already, as these are
the core protocols used to make your GWT app talk to your App Engine
back-end.

I'm pretty sure you understand that, but its important to have a clear
idea of your 'software stack'. What each component is, what it can &
can't do, what its responsible for. Perhaps make some toy projects
that only use App Engine(serving up static HTML), or only use GWT, to
get a better idea of where the separation is. (This works for any
other components/libraries you add later, it can be good to test them
in isolation before using them in tandem with other pieces of
software)

Just a quick note on OpenID.. I dont know it that well, I looked at
the specs a few years ago, and will be again soon, but unless you
really really need it, its probably best to stick with the Google
Authentication API at first, as its stable and a LOT less complicated
to get right.

Hope this helps, my main point is, API References/User Guides/Protocol
Specs  are your friends, when no-one has made a tutorial for a
specific case.
Good luck,
Aidan




On Sat, Jul 30, 2011 at 2:44 PM, Matthew Cote <mcjavalearner@gmail.com> wrote:

> I am sure there are numerous reasons why you would use the GWT without
> the app engine, but I am primarily interested in writing app engine
> apps with the GWT - there is a annoying division of tutorials and
> documentation regarding GWT and the Google App Engine. In the Google
> App Engine site there are tutorials for OpenID, OAuth, and the like, I
> cannot find a decent step by step tutorial for using OpenID with GWT.
>
> I would really like to see more tutorials for the GWT - especially on
> OpenID, but also - how to play audio, how to use the data store with
> GWT, Single Sign-On, etc I guess what it comes down to is - How can I
> apply the tutorials in App Engine Documentation to the GWT? Can the
> GWT or App Engine doc site include an explanation of how the two work
> together or how they relate - I want to use the GWT because it makes
> writing client-side code very easy for me, I want to use the App
> Engine because it makes deployment very easy for me. I want to use the
> two together.

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